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About Becky.

Hi, I’m Becky! I use they/them and she/her pronouns.

I’m on a mission to help neurodivergent people feel seen, valued, and safe to unmask through the practice of yoga. I’m kind of a nerd about yoga and neurodiversity, and my approach to life is uniquely informed by my AuDHD (Autistic + ADHD) neurotype. I enjoy having a bit of a rebellious spirit, petting moss, reading science and sci-fi books, hiking, meditating with trees, playing tabletop games, and cuddling with my dogs.  

I work as an openly neurodivergent/neuroqueer yoga practitioner and teacher, human resources professional, neurodiversity advocate, and a community space-holder and bridge-builder for the Neurodivergent community. I am passionate about cultivating welcoming, affirming, and neuro-inclusive environments that honor each individual’s experiences and intersecting identities.

 

My earnest desire to contribute to social and environmental justice, combined with my love for nature, has also led to a role in healing our environment, and in my spare time I volunteer doing land restoration work with a local non-profit in Racine, WI— the ancestral lands of the Peoria, Kickapoo, Bodwéwadmi (Potawatomi), Hoocąk (Ho-Chunk) peoples, among others.

My yoga practice is a huge part of how I am able to show up for myself, my peers, and this planet; it’s how I stay regulated in a world that isn’t designed for neurodivergent folks. I’m eager to share the experience of yoga and mindfulness with you in a way that is neurodiversity-affirming and body-neutral. Check out my Events page for upcoming virtual and local in-person offerings in the southeastern Wisconsin area.

Here is an abbreviated list of my credentials:

  • 40+ years of lived experience as a neurodivergent human being.

  • Bachelor’s degree in psychology and religious studies; for as long as I remember, I’ve had a deep and focused interest in how other people sense, think, and interact with their reality.

  • 20+ years working with people in various capacities in social services, mental health recovery, and human resources.

  • I completed my 200-hour yoga teacher certification in 2020, and as of March 2024, I'm currently enrolled in a 300-hr YTT program with an emphasis on community outreach through Warrior Flow School.

  • I hold certificates from Rhythmic Movement Training International (RMTi), Yoga For All Bodies, and Yotism (yoga for Autism) related to providing accessible, inclusive, and trauma-informed yoga and mindfulness for all bodies and nervous systems.

Becky stands, smiling, on the rocky shore of Lake Michigan with bright clouds above. The wind ruffles their short brown hair. They are wearing a black t-shirt with the word “neurodivergent” repeated in rainbow colors.

Image description: Becky stands, smiling, on the rocky shore of Lake Michigan with bright clouds above. The wind ruffles their short brown hair. They are wearing a black t-shirt with the word “neurodivergent” repeated in rainbow colors.

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Let’s celebrate neurodiversity by embracing all of the unique ways we feel, think, move, and connect!
Image description: Becky stands barefoot in tree pose, smiling, against a background of spring trees in a grassy park, with yellow dandelions scattered like stars. They are wearing an indigo t-shirt and black leggings.

Image description: Becky stands barefoot in tree pose, smiling, against a background of spring trees in a grassy park, with yellow dandelions scattered like stars. They are wearing an indigo t-shirt and black leggings.

About this project.

Yoga for Neurodiversity is a project I started in 2021, shortly after receiving an Autism diagnosis at the age of 38. I was finding it all to be a lot to process, and desired a way to share my experiences as a neurodivergent yoga practitioner with a community of fellow human beings who would understand. This project has been growing and evolving with me, and has involved developing skills like using social media, recording videos, offering live in-person and online yoga workshops, public speaking, neurodiversity advocacy, support group facilitation, and community leadership. I am just beginning.

​If you are new to the language of the Neurodiversity Movement, or new to the practice of Yoga, I invite you to learn more here: What is Yoga for Neurodiversity?

In its current iteration, this project is focused on building community with folks who on a similar path; together, we are learning what it means to practice yoga in a way that is neurodiversity-affirming, accessible, and respectful of our many intersecting identities. Some questions our community has been considering…

  • How might a neurodivergent person experience yoga differently?

  • What access barriers exist for neurodivergent people to be able to discover, learn about, and practice yoga and mindfulness?

  • What does it mean to be "neurodiversity-affirming", “neurodivergent-friendly”, or “neuro-inclusive” in yoga spaces?

  • How can yoga teachers show up in a way that really celebrates differences and encourages authenticity over conformity?

  • Which yoga and mindfulness practices/lineages are neurodivergent students most drawn to, and why?

 

​Looking for the answers to these questions? Check out this article in Yoga Journal: https://www.yogajournal.com/teach/what-is-neurodiversity-affirming-yoga/

​Sharing the important message that yoga is for all bodies and all brains is as natural to me as it is challenging. I can't imagine being any other way, and yet, being myself and doing this work in a world that is often too bright, too loud, too fast, and too complicated can also be exhausting. It is good to have company. Thanks for being here on this journey with me!

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